Got this for Christmas and it is pretty fun. The putting is nonsense but most every simulater available has terrible putting. Only complaint I have is that in order to use the simulater you better have a pretty powerful laptop or desktop in terms of graphics card and memory as my laptop was not powerful enough to run the game. So that extra money I could’ve used to buy the skytrak went into a computer. Other than that it works great and is a lot of fun. The yardage is preset for clubs but that can be changed in the options for your clubs. Set lofts and lengths of clubs to improve the accuracy of yardage and strikes.
“As a professional golfer and tech enthusiast, I demand the best & most advanced equipment available. I love the HD Simulator because of its incredible realism & pinpoint accuracy. I was amazed at the technology and playing experience. My coach and I really like using the integrated video swing & weight transfer analysis to fine-tune my swing in real-time. When it comes to simulators, there is simply no comparison to HD Golf.” 
The elaborateness of your simulator setup will vary based how much room is available and how often you’ll be using the golf simulator.  If you have space set aside in a garage you can actually build a 10ft x 15ft x 10ft wood frame and cover it with mesh netting.  In that amount of space you can then set a computer table to the side, construct a rack for clubs, and cover the floor with a turf mat for a realistic garage 18.  Framing your simulator out in this manner may push your budget over $2000 but if you’re handy with a screw gun you can probably knock the job out yourself in an afternoon.
We strongly suggest staying away from the very inexpensive (under $100) or “mini” projectors that seem to be popping up everywhere.  The reason for this being that most cheap projectors lack the brightness (measured in lumens) needed to display a good picture in anything brighter than complete darkness.  Remember, the brighter you want your simulator bay the stronger you need your projector to be.  After all, no one wants to swing in the dark!
Up to this point you probably have about $800-$1,000 wrapped up in the OptiShot and your projector along with another $300 if you’ve built a permanent enclosure, but luckily those represent the last of the major purchases for your home golf simulator.  The rest of the items used in the simulator can be purchased at your discretion to maximize the feel of a real golf outing.
In reality, a golf swing happens very quickly, and can be difficult to improve, especially when you don’t have analytics and recording technology to visualize the swing. Subtle adjustments can result in dramatic improvements – it’s critical you understand your individual swing dynamics. You don’t need to be computer savvy to use the Golf Studio. The integrated Golf Studio operates from a single touch screen, and is simple to use.
This is the same golf simulator that a lot of pro shops use. It comes packed with all the features, like weather effects, portable design, detailed readouts and more. It’s one of the most expensive simulators you will find, so consider if it fits into your budget before you get too interested in it. If you plan to simulate the game for the long haul, though, then this is probably the way to go.

This is the most crucial piece of the puzzle for your home golf simulator. The actual sensor system you choose will have an enormous impact on your experience. After speaking with Cory, I came to understand that there are endless variables. It all depends on the kind of golfer you are, your budget, the size of your room, how important accuracy is to you, and a host of other factors.
At this price point, you are most likely looking at an OptiShot simulator. It’s currently around $300, and this is the entry level. You can have plenty of fun with a product like this, but be aware that the accuracy is limited. Optishot only measures the speed, path, and face angle of your club. From there it calculates where your ball is going but is not directly measuring the actual golf ball after impact. So you might not make great contact, but OptiShot would simulate a shot that was struck almost perfectly. It is essential to understand that the info provided could be misleading on individual shots, which could frustrate players.
As with the original OptiShot, this product will not provide you with data on a Trackman level as it does not measure the ball, only the club. However, it does cover all the most important swing data that you can think of, such as club-head speed, shot-shape, swing-path reading, face impact angle, swing tempo, face area contact, and distance. With this information, you will be able to focus entirely on improving your swing.
×