At this price point, you are most likely looking at an OptiShot simulator. It’s currently around $300, and this is the entry level. You can have plenty of fun with a product like this, but be aware that the accuracy is limited. Optishot only measures the speed, path, and face angle of your club. From there it calculates where your ball is going but is not directly measuring the actual golf ball after impact. So you might not make great contact, but OptiShot would simulate a shot that was struck almost perfectly. It is essential to understand that the info provided could be misleading on individual shots, which could frustrate players.
Feedback– A golf simulator can only help you determine how well you are doing if it provides adequate feedback. If the golf simulator tells you how far you are hitting, how close to the mark you are, what your ball speed is and other pertinent information, then you can use that to improve your game and change the way you swing for the better. Without that kind of information, though, you’ll be training somewhat blindly, not sure if you need to make changes to become better.

Jim McLean’s 8 Step Swing, which incorporates the swings of Ernie Els, Ben Hogan and Tiger Woods, is an additional feature many HD Golfers decide to add to their simulators. Step by step, a golfer is able to perfect every element of their swing. The simulator records and analyzes a golfer’s swing in real time. When the system detects that the golfer’s position and swing are out of the “corridor of success” or have committed a “death move”, the simulator will automatically alert the golfer and present virtual coaching from Jim McLean.
There are a few things you need to keep in mind if you are seriously thinking about investing in a golf simulator. First off, if you want to maximize your user experience, you need to get the simulator working properly. For that, you’ll need a good computer and a decent graphics card to get the best visual image possible or a dedicated high end golf simulator.
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