Almost every single simulator package is going to require a computer to run its software. Hardware is an added cost that many golfers will not consider. It’s possible you may already have a laptop, tablet, or desktop option that is capable of running the software. Most systems will require a more robust graphics card, which you can easily upgrade on an older computer if you are handy.

I've had this for a couple weeks now and have played a few rounds on TGC. Pretty fun. As others have noted, this won't register fat and thin swings. My distances also seemed off (short 15 to 20). Adjustments to the club's loft and shaft length (from head to bottom of sensor) helped dial my real distances I guess by changing club speed. It seems like path and club angle at impact are accurate. Can't really tell on side spin and have toed some swings that register as straight shots.


If you’re lucky enough to live in an area where there is a local golf center with simulators and indoor driving ranges/domes consider yourself blessed.  Today’s commercial golf simulators really are top of the line and the spacious room allowing you to use your full swing really is priceless.  Unfortunately though these simulators can be both crowded and costly as they look to cater to all of the other anxious golfers who are not so patiently awaiting the arrival of spring.


Competitors typically use lower cost, inferior components, such as: Home PC’s to run their simulators, which tend to suffer from instability and frequent required updates. They also use polypropylene turf, single element-screens with high elasticity-rebound and reduced longevity. Both screens & turf last a half-life when compared to our in-house designed screens & turf. Other areas of compromise extend to their 3rd party cameras which capture your swing, but don’t form a complete alliance with the rest of the system.
Feedback– A golf simulator can only help you determine how well you are doing if it provides adequate feedback. If the golf simulator tells you how far you are hitting, how close to the mark you are, what your ball speed is and other pertinent information, then you can use that to improve your game and change the way you swing for the better. Without that kind of information, though, you’ll be training somewhat blindly, not sure if you need to make changes to become better.

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