Feedback– A golf simulator can only help you determine how well you are doing if it provides adequate feedback. If the golf simulator tells you how far you are hitting, how close to the mark you are, what your ball speed is and other pertinent information, then you can use that to improve your game and change the way you swing for the better. Without that kind of information, though, you’ll be training somewhat blindly, not sure if you need to make changes to become better.
The hardest part about setting up your golf simulator will finding a the right space.  A common area of space that many home simulators use is 10 feet wide by 15 feet long by 10 feet high.  The minimum code for basement ceiling height is 7 feet and the OptiShot simulator recommends at least 8.5 feet—we recommend even more height than that if you plan on swinging your driver in the simulator.  With that said, generally speaking the best spot for setting up your home golf simulator will be in the garage.

There are a few things you need to keep in mind if you are seriously thinking about investing in a golf simulator. First off, if you want to maximize your user experience, you need to get the simulator working properly. For that, you’ll need a good computer and a decent graphics card to get the best visual image possible or a dedicated high end golf simulator.


This is the same golf simulator that a lot of pro shops use. It comes packed with all the features, like weather effects, portable design, detailed readouts and more. It’s one of the most expensive simulators you will find, so consider if it fits into your budget before you get too interested in it. If you plan to simulate the game for the long haul, though, then this is probably the way to go.

I've had this for a couple weeks now and have played a few rounds on TGC. Pretty fun. As others have noted, this won't register fat and thin swings. My distances also seemed off (short 15 to 20). Adjustments to the club's loft and shaft length (from head to bottom of sensor) helped dial my real distances I guess by changing club speed. It seems like path and club angle at impact are accurate. Can't really tell on side spin and have toed some swings that register as straight shots.

I have the trainer for about 2 weeks now. I have been using it in my backyard a couple times a day. I am 60 years old in great shape but I've lost a lot of flexabilty; the Gold Flex really helps with this and has increased my range of motion on the back swing. I also live near a driving range and go there about 3 times a week. The first few times I went there after using Gold Flex I was a bit frustrated; I had some improvement, a little more distance and better follow through, but nothing major. Then yesterday at the range I took my driver, setup, relaxed and specifically tried to emulate that backswing I used with the Gold Flex. I connected, and holy smokes, the ball went sailing about 270 yards, and I was only hitting 230 yards when I conneced before. I teed ... full review
Competitors typically use lower cost, inferior components, such as: Home PC’s to run their simulators, which tend to suffer from instability and frequent required updates. They also use polypropylene turf, single element-screens with high elasticity-rebound and reduced longevity. Both screens & turf last a half-life when compared to our in-house designed screens & turf. Other areas of compromise extend to their 3rd party cameras which capture your swing, but don’t form a complete alliance with the rest of the system.
Price– This is actually one of the key factors that needs to be brought into consideration when you look at golfing simulators. This equipment can become very expensive very fast, and you need to set realistic expectations for what you can spend. Set a budget when you go shopping for a simulator and consider if it is cost effective to get one of these. Golfoid.com suggests you compare the cost of buying simulator to spending money actually going to the course. In some instances, it is cheaper to just use the golf courses near you to train rather than to buy an expensive golf simulator.
Inaccurate– What most people look for in golf simulations is a way to play the actual game in the comfort and convenience of their own home, and a simulation should feel like the actual game, says Golf Digest. You should not expect anything other than a true simulation when you buy one of these devices, and if you aren’t getting that, then you need to look for a different simulator. Once again, reviews are your friend, and you can use them to tell you what simulators offer the real deal.
1) You should choose the SkyTrak Budget if you want the best all around golf simulator package for under $5,000. It is possible to create a DIY golf simulator for less than this, but if you want to save yourself time and avoid potential costly mistakes, you are going to love this package. While this package doesn't have the screen size that the three in the $10,000 and under tier do, the SkyTrak Budget Package gives you the same SkyTrak Launch Monitor and projector with a more budget-friendly hitting bay and golf mat all for under $5,000.

Price– This is actually one of the key factors that needs to be brought into consideration when you look at golfing simulators. This equipment can become very expensive very fast, and you need to set realistic expectations for what you can spend. Set a budget when you go shopping for a simulator and consider if it is cost effective to get one of these. Golfoid.com suggests you compare the cost of buying simulator to spending money actually going to the course. In some instances, it is cheaper to just use the golf courses near you to train rather than to buy an expensive golf simulator.
This entire process tends to make the practice session less authentic than it should be. With the ability of the turf on the Fairway Pro to move with the swing, no residual force is relayed to your joints. Instead, it serves as an accurate simulation of the give real grass has, and as a result, the feedback comes in the form of loss or gains in ball flight, as with real grass. This makes practicing on the Fairway Pro much more authentic than on other golf mats. In addition to that, the Fairway Pro also comes in a portable, foldable casing, has durable sprigs rated at one million cycles, and a replaceable premium quality turf.

Those of you golfers who live in cold climates and can’t always go to the range will significantly appreciate this device. It includes pretty accurate infrared sensors that will measure the club-head speed and point-of-impact by shooting about 10,000 pulses per second at you both before and after impact. Then, the OptiShot software will process the information and give you a fairly accurate illustration of your shot.
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